Tuesday, 18 June 2013

The Web Porn Summit

While everyone is firmly looking in the direction of the G8, it is worth pointing out that there is another important event happening in politics at the moment. Various important officials, from both internet companies and the government, are taking part in what has been described as a “web porn summit.”


They are meeting to discuss how best to protect people, especially children, from unwanted porngraphy, as well as the detection and removal of child abuse on the internet. The people involved have clearly outlined there, sometimes differing, opinions, and they can be summed up pretty easily.


The internet companies think they are doing fine, and that everyone should relax,because they have it covered and children are getting better protected everyday, while child abuse images are being blocked pretty well.


Campaigners, including quite a few MPs, are pointing out that everyone should not relax, that the internet providers are not close to having it all taken care off, and that some serious work needs to be done. Ed Miliband has said that voluntary controls have failed, while Cameron says clearly more can be done.


This is pretty much what you would expect both sides to say, as the companies don’t want government interference to be much higher than it already is, since the huge lumbering political forces that are at work just slow things down and get in the way of business. The politicians, meanwhile, have got to keep on talking about taking action because it is an admirable cause, but are fairly non-descript over what they are committed to.


Whatever the solution, these people have got to realise that something is wrong. It is not exactly a secret that the internet is home to all the depravity and disgusting practices that humankind feels it can get away with when nobody is watching. It is a useful tool that has been given a dark side by easily accessible pornagraphy and child abuse. This is no time to simply stick our head in the sand and say that everything is fine, because it really is not.


The problem with the internet companies is not that they haven't been working, because they have, and they should really be applauded for the work they have done, especially with regards to child pornography, but the fact that they don't seem to act with any sense of urgency. They are like a teenager waking up in the morning, coming to terms with the problem that they are late for school really far too slowly compared to how they should be acting.


If we are going to be a technological generation, always working and interacting with computers and the internet, then we need to make sure that the darker areas of this world are kept in check. Parental authority should not be undermined by technology, and people need to get off their backsides and realise just how damaging pornagraphy is. The people in charge are going to have to do a lot better than they currently are.

It may be that the government steps in, forcing the companies to implement a mechanism to force parents to opt in to receiving certain websites, since this would surely mean that less pornagraphy would be avaliable to family households, but really it is up to the companies themselves to realise that they need to get a move on. It would be better if the heavy hand of the government did not have to get involved, but really these companies should be able to do the work themselves.

2 comments:

  1. Of course the ISPs haven't been taking an urgent act against this. It's not their job to nanny you through the Internet, and I'll be damned if they are expected to.
    These companies are there to provide a service, they focus on providing fast and reliable connections to their customers so they can access whatever they want online.
    You the customer have to focus on what you want to access, and they have been giving methods to allow the blocking of websites with unsuitable material, but as with all methods there is ALWAYS a way around it.
    Point is, if you don't want to smell crap stay out of the lavatory or hold your nose, because whining about it won't change a thing. Don't put this on the ISP because they get enough abuse as it is.
    The world is not yours, the Internet is not yours, it's everyone's and you should learn to tolerate that instead of labeling other people's interests as the 'darker areas"

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  2. The problem is tat certain areas of web, the parts that I called, "the darker areas," are bits that do need to be regulated. I label them like that because that is exactly what they are, and that is not something that has anything to do with tolerating them. What I was supporting was not the removal of any internet freedom, as the customer would still have choice.

    This is an issue that is about protecting people, and even though there would be ways around these measures, that doesn't mean that they wouldn't help at all. Banning burglary does not prevent all burglaries taking place, for example.

    If I were to stay out the lavatory, I would be ignoring a problem and letting it fester, and that is not going to do anybody any good.

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